Argentinian visit to Mulloon

Discussing the step diffusion system, which can be seen in the background

Discussing the step diffusion system, which can be seen in the background

The Mulloon Institute hosted a small private tour during May with international visitors from a government research farm in southern Argentina, including the farm manager and several researchers. They were joined by a visiting scholar from the University of Tasmania who is currently researching with the Australian National University and who arranged the tour.

With a reasonably extreme climate in southern Argentina, including very low annual rainfall (270mm/year) and nearly half a metre of snow in winter, they were keen to learn more about rehydration processes, increasing productivity and profitability, and obtaining natural resource outcomes. They hope to be able to consequently provide advice to farmers back in their region and lead by example.

While there were some interesting challenges translating the content presented by Research Coordinator Luke Peel into Argentinian and then having questions translated into English, it was a very satisfying tour for all involved. Farm Manager Michael Fitzgerald also joined the tour and was able to provide insights into farm operational aspects.

Luke took the visitors to Peter’s Pond where creek restoration has already taken place and vegetation is well established, and to the step diffusion system where sloping country is now being restored. At both sites he explained the various activities and concepts taking place in the relevant stages.

Viewing the organic poultry operations from the road

Viewing the organic poultry operations from the road

The visitors were impressed with the leaky weirs, but even more so with the step diffusion site which presented some workable solutions for use in their own context in Argentina. They were also keen to learn about the organic poultry operations at Duralla, but quarantine restrictions for overseas visitors meant they could only view the operations from the road while Michael answered questions about the Maremma guardian dogs, and the combined effect of using cattle and chickens for grazing and nutrient cycling.

Thanks to Franca, Laura and Jose for taking the time to visit us at Mulloon Creek Natural Farms from Argentina and to Linda for organising the tour with The Mulloon Institute. 

If you or your group are interested in a private tour of the landscape rehydration works at Mulloon Creek, they can be arranged by donation and tailored to suit your needs. Contact us today via: info@themullooninstitute.org