Landscape Rehydration workshop success in North Queensland

 Cam Wilson (The Mulloon Institute), Sam Skeat (NQ Dry Tropics) and grazier Chris LeFeurve at Worona Station, Mingela.

Cam Wilson (The Mulloon Institute), Sam Skeat (NQ Dry Tropics) and grazier Chris LeFeurve at Worona Station, Mingela.

Cam Wilson from The Mulloon Institute has been up north talking with Queensland graziers interested in landscape rehydration works to improve their propertys’ resilience to drought.

The Rehydrating Landscape field day hosted by NQ Dry Tropics at Worona Station, North Queensland aimed to showcase examples of how moisture can be retained on properties, and to provide tools for working out cost-effective ways of implementing solutions to problems like landscape erosion.

According to Cam, “Rehydrating landscapes is about making use of what little water we have, and reinstating the old hydrological processes which then underpin the ecological processes to provide benefits for the grazier and his production.”

“The more we can put the old processes in place the less we have to do and so it’s all about making systematic interventions that really work with those old structures and processes.

“When landholders understand their country condition they can use strategic criteria to develop bang for buck repair programs,” he said.

Graziers were able to see first-hand how a local producer has increased his water filtration, reduced erosion and maximised pasture function. The day also covered repairing eroded gullies and reducing sediment run-off from properties, increasing biodiversity and pasture, and utilising controlled grazing.

Read more: https://www.northqueenslandregister.com.au/story/5514756/mingela-graziers-drought-resilience-plan/