We're 2017 State Landcare Champions!

Left to right: Peter Hazell (Mulloon Community Landscape Rehydration Project Coordinator), Richard Allsopp (The Mulloon Institute, Board Member) and Martin Royds (The Mulloon Institute, Advisory Council Member). IMAGE BY: Simon Dallinger Photography

Left to right: Peter Hazell (Mulloon Community Landscape Rehydration Project Coordinator), Richard Allsopp (The Mulloon Institute, Board Member) and Martin Royds (The Mulloon Institute, Advisory Council Member). IMAGE BY: Simon Dallinger Photography

The Mulloon Institute declared State Landcare Champion

27 October 2017

An innovative not-for-profit organisation aiming to restore an entire water catchment in southern New South Wales has been declared a State Landcare Champion in the ‘Australian Government’s Excellence in Sustainable Farm Practices’ category at the 2017 NSW Landcare Awards.

The annual awards recognise the commitment of Australians working to protect the environment and deliver more sustainable agriculture. Winners from each state and territory will go on to be finalists in the 2018 National Landcare Awards.

The Mulloon Institute’s major project – the Mulloon Community Landscape Rehydration Project – aims to rebuild the natural landscape function of the entire Mulloon Catchment and boost its resilience against climatic extremes.

The project represents a major up-scaling of the successful Natural Sequence Farming pilot at Mulloon Creek Natural Farms, which is based on the work of independent landscape thinker Peter Andrews OAM.

Spanning 23,000 hectares and 50 kilometres of creeks and tributaries, the project focuses on creek repair and erosion control and involves more than 20 local landholders.

“This work shows Australia the way forward for regenerative landscape restoration and demonstrates just how beneficial landscape repair can be for increased agricultural production,” said the Honourable Gary Nairn AO, who chairs The Mulloon Institute’s Board.

The Mulloon Institute was established by Tony Coote AM to actively research, demonstrate, monitor and share regenerative land management methods and is based in Bungendore, 40 minutes east of Canberra.

“We’re really proud to be chosen as a Landcare Champion and are happy to share our successes and mistakes as we organise the regeneration of other catchments across Australia,” said Tony Coote.

The Institute’s work has also been recognised by the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Solutions Network and is one of five projects chosen globally to help it develop guidelines for sustainable, profitable and productive farming.

The Mulloon Institute was amongst an impressive field that included Grand Champions Murrumbidgee Landcare Inc. for their ‘Cross Property Planning Project’ connecting neighbouring landholders, and the Small Farms Network – Capital Region for their sustainable agriculture network.