June “Jachère” 2017

from the Chairman, The Mulloon Institute

As three of our months start with the letter “J” (January, June & July) I have obviously set myself a challenge to be not only creative but also relevant when I select a title for my update for those months. Peruse your dictionary and you will quickly see our English language is not blessed with an abundance of “J” words! I’ve already used “jottings” and “journal” for example.

Invertebrate survey of Mulloon Creek 2016-16

Invertebrate survey of Mulloon Creek 2016-16

A recent aquatic invertebrate study of Mulloon Creek has revealed an astounding number of bugs! 

Nearly 3500 individual invertebrates were identified across over 60 species, with a couple of creatures whose identities are yet to be confirmed. 

Huge thanks to Dr Paul Cooper and Thomas Wallenius from Australian National University who conducted the baseline survey, and to South East LLS who helped fund the project.

 

DPI Office of Water & DPI Fisheries creek walk

Staff from the NSW DPI Office of Water and DPI Fisheries, along with The Mulloon Institute’s Science Advisory Committee, walked a section of Mulloon Creek with us last week, to better understand the scope of works being undertaken and planned as part of the Mulloon Community Landscape Rehydration Project.

The works are part of the MCLRP which aims to build upon results from the successful Natural Sequence Farming pilot project on the MCNF home farm.

Tony Coote (founder of The Mulloon Institute) and Peter Andrews (independent landscape thinker) were also on hand to answer questions about the project.

It was great to have several landholders there too who are taking part in the project. Their participation in the project and reflections on how it is impacting the creek is invaluable to our work.

Overall it was a great day, talking with inspired people about a unique vision for the future of the Mulloon Catchment – one where it is buffered against climatic extremes, with more reliable stream flows, improved ecosystem functioning and enhanced agricultural productivity.

Well done to Peter Hazell (MCLRP Project Coordinator) for organising such an informative and well run day.

Walking the creek with Peter Andrews

Peter Andrews – independent landscape thinker and founder of Natural Sequence Farming – recently walked a section of Mulloon Creek to help with the planning of the Mulloon Community Landscape Rehydration Project.

Natural Sequence Farming involves managing landscapes in a way that restores natural function and resilience, which allows the land to flourish even in times of drought.

The Mulloon Institute is working with 20 landholders within the Mulloon catchment to recreate the successes of the initial pilot project at Mulloon Creek Natural Farms.

Peter gave us some great feedback on the works to date and was happy to sketch out some valuable suggestions.

Thanks Peter, it was great having you out there!

If you are interested in learning about Natural Sequence Farming for yourself, The Mulloon Institute and Tarwyn Park Training will be running a four day training course on it this November 2017.

Click here for more details. http://bit.ly/2tvDQtn

NSW Environmental Trust & South East LLS creek visit

Thanks to Michael Dine of the NSW Environmental Trust and Felicty Sturgiss from South East LLS, who visited recently to see and discuss proposed creek enhancement works at Mulloon Farm North.

The works are part of the Mulloon Community Landscape Rehydration Project which aims to build upon results from the successful Natural Sequence Farming pilot project on the MCNF home farm.

MCLRP's ultimate aim is to rebuild natural landscape function and resilience for the entire Mulloon catchment. This will help buffer the catchment against climatic extremes, lead to more reliable stream flows, improve ecosystem functioning and enhance agricultural productivity.

Birkenburn flume construction

Green Army teams have been working hard to rehabilitate an eroded gully in the Mulloon catchment near Braidwood, NSW.

Participants mostly from nearby Canberra, used rock, recycled concrete, soil and vegetation to armour a headcut that’s been working its way up a side tributary.

The protective rock structure aims to slow down water flow, retain sediment and enhance the site’s stability and overall productivity for grazing and ecological purposes.

The works form part of the Mulloon Community Landscape Rehydration Project, which spans 23,000 hectares and involves 20 local properties, including Birkenburn where the gully is located.

Many partners are involved in the MCLRP including the United Nations Sustainable Development Solutions Network.

The MCLRP is one of only five catchment scale projects worldwide helping the UN develop guidelines for sustainable, profitable and productive farming.

May "Missive" 2017

from the Chairman, The Mulloon Institute

You have probably been checking your inbox over the past two weeks wondering when you were going to receive my May update – I can only hope! Seriously though, unfortunately the past three plus weeks have not been pleasant as I’ve been dealing with the consequences of kidney stones. Long story short, many days in hospital resulting from an aggressive infection and now compulsory rest at home with an operation expected on the 23rd June. Hopefully back to somewhere normal after that.